Pakistan - Wind Measurement Data

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Data repository for measurements from 12 wind masts in Pakistan. Data transmits daily reports for wind speed, wind direction, air pressure, relative humidity and temperature. Please refer to the country project page for additional outputs and reports, including the installation reports: http://esmap.org/node/3058. For access to maps and GIS layers, please visit the Global Wind Atlas: https://globalwindatlas.info/ Please cite as: [Data/information/map obtained from the] “World Bank via ENERGYDATA.info, under a project funded by the Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP).

Data and Resources

Additional Info

Field Value
Source https://globalwindatlas.info/
Author Clara Ivanescu
Maintainer Oliver Knight
Last Updated July 29, 2019, 11:59 (UTC)
Created February 23, 2017, 09:42 (UTC)
Topic Extractive industries
Country Pakistan
Region South Asia
Status Complete
Published year 2017
Start date 2016
End date 2018
Group Renewable Energy Resource Mapping

Comments [3 ]


Data Authenticity Created 04.24.2019 01:35

Some of the data contains NaN values. What are the potential reasons for this?
Similarly, some of the data is very less even 0.2m/s. Is this the instrumental error?

None Created 04.30.2019 13:42

Dear Visitor,

1) Datasets from meteorology masts usually contain a small number of erroneous or missing observations (should be less than 1%) due to temporary technical malfunction issues. Those missing or erroneous observations are conventionally flagged as 9999 or NaN (i.e. not a number) depending on the settings of the data logger, i.e. the computer collecting the data from all of the instruments on the mast. Commonly the first day of observations on any mast should be discarded for that reason. If any dataset contains more than, say, 1% of NaNs or 9999s, please let us know exactly what dataset, and we’ll investigate it.

2) Very low wind speeds may have been measured perfectly correctly. Generally wind speeds should increase significantly with height above ground level (though that may not always be the case, particularly on hilltops). It may be a good idea to plot wind speeds from several heights in the same graph to check that all anemometers follow the same pattern, and/or to correlate the measurements from the different measurement heights. Two anemometers at neighboring heights, say, 60m and 80m - or 20m and 40m should have a correlation around 95% or more. If one anemometer has extremely low readings and its data is not well correlated with data from the next higher level, it may be due to an instrument failure (usually defective ball bearings). In that case please advise us of the exact dataset where this seems to occur, and we’ll investigate it and tell you if we think this is an instrument failure.

Thank you for using ENERGYDATA.INFO.
The ENERGYDATA Team

Last edited: 04.30.2019 at 15:16
Created 05.01.2019 20:49

Dear Visitor,

1) Datasets from meteorology masts usually contain a small number of erroneous or missing observations (should be less than 1%) due to temporary technical malfunction issues. Those missing or erroneous observations are conventionally flagged as 9999 or NaN (i.e. not a number) depending on the settings of the data logger, i.e. the computer collecting the data from all of the instruments on the mast. Commonly the first day of observations on any mast should be discarded for that reason. If any dataset contains more than, say, 1% of NaNs or 9999s, please let us know exactly what dataset, and we’ll investigate it.

2) Very low wind speeds may have been measured perfectly correctly. Generally wind speeds should increase significantly with height above ground level (though that may not always be the case, particularly on hilltops). It may be a good idea to plot wind speeds from several heights in the same graph as it is done below to check that all anemometers follow the same pattern, and/or to correlate the measurements from the different measurement heights. Two anemometers at neighboring heights, say, 60m and 80m - or 20m and 40m should have a correlation around 95% or more. If one anemometer has extremely low readings and its data is not well correlated with data from the next higher level, it may be due to an instrument failure (usually defective ball bearings). In that case please advise us of the exact dataset where this seems to occur, and we’ll investigate it and tell you if we think this is an instrument failure.

Thank you for using ENERGYDATA.INFO.
The ENERGYDATA Team

Question Created 01.24.2019 06:51

Why is temperature for Quetta Data more at higher altitude? How can temperature be more at higher altitude?

None Created 03.20.2019 18:51

Dear Visitor,

The configuration for the Quetta mast is a 76m mast, which is different compared to the other masts. The temperature was previously given at the height of 76m (columns BI-BL) starting on 14/05/2016 to measure. The height was then corrected to 61m (columns BE-BH) starting on 19/12/2016. Hence, from 19/12/2016, T76 is discarded.

Please consider the following dates for Quetta measurements:
14/05/2016 – 18/12/2016 – T76 (columns BI-BL)
19/12/2016 – 30/09/2018 – T61 (columns BE-BH)

Thank you for using ENERGYDATA.INFO.
The ENERGYDATA Team

Last edited: 03.20.2019 at 18:53
questions about wind speed Created 12.27.2018 15:11

sir what is meant by a20_wind_speed and a40_wind_speed also what are the units of measurments

None Created 01.10.2019 14:46

Dear Visitor,
The ‘a’ in a20_wind_speed and a40_wind_speed indicate wind speeds at heights of 20m and 40m above ground level. Wind speed in this dataset is measured in meters per second (m/s).

For more information on headers and the units for each single headers, the details can be found in attachment files named ‘Headers’. For example: Wind-Measurements_Pakistan_Chakri_WB-ESMAP_Header.

Thank you for using ENERGYDATA.INFO.
The ENERGYDATA Team

Last edited: 04.30.2019 at 15:29